Associate Professor Ashvin Thambyah

BSc, MSc, PhD, PGCertAcadPrac

Biography

Dr Ashvin Thambyah joined the University of Auckland as a lecturer in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering in 2007. Before joining the University, he was employed as a research engineer at the Faculty of Medicine in the National University of Singapore. There he worked closely with orthopaedic surgeons on various aspects of musculoskeletal research and contributed to many clinical projects involving bone and joint disease and pathology.

Ashvin is a recipient of the Albert Trillat Young Investigator Award, presented by the International Knee Society, for his research on knee joint cartilage. His current research is concerned with linking physiologically-relevant macro-level joint mechanics to the microstructural and micromechanical response of the cartilage/bone system. The aim is to provide new insights into the way by which the tissue microstructure and the external load bearing conditions, together, influence the overall mechanobiology of the joint. The downstream application of this research will be to improve our knowledge and understanding of the mechanical factors involved in the joint degenerative process.
 

Qualifications

Postgraduate Diploma in Academic Practice, The University of Auckland, Auckland 2010
PhD (Orthopaedic Biomechanics), 2005 National University of Singapore, Singapore
MSc (Engineering and Physical Science in Medicine), D.I.C. , 1994 Imperial College, London
BSc (Biomedical Engineering), 1992 Marquette University, Milwaukee (USA)

 

Research | Current

  • Mechanical factors of osteoarthritis.
  • Physiologically-relevant models of joint and tissue loading.
  • Mechanobiology of musculoskeletal tissues.
     

Research groups

  • Biological Materials Research
  • Mechanobiology Research Group

Teaching | Current

  • CHEMMAT 213 - Transfer Processes I - also Course Director
  • CHEMMAT 232 - Process Design I - also Course Director
  • CHEMMAT 751 - Research Project - also Course Director
  • CHEMMAT 753 - Non-Metallic Materials - also Course Director

Distinctions/Honours

TEACHING

Teaching Award, Top 15 in Faculty, School of Engineering, University of Auckland (2015)
Teaching Award, Top 15 in Faculty, School of Engineering, University of Auckland (2013)
Faculty of Engineering Award: Early Career Teaching Excellence Award (2010)
Teaching Award, Top 15 in Faculty, School of Engineering, University of Auckland (2010)
Teaching Award, Top 15 in Faculty, School of Engineering, University of Auckland. (2009)
Awarded the Centre for Academic Development Faculty Fellowship in Academic Practice. (2008)
Teaching Award, Top 15 in Faculty, School of Engineering, The University of Auckland. (2007)

RESEARCH

International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS) Prize in basic science for 2016
Spine Society of Australia - Research Prize (2014)
Outstanding Paper - Basic Science - Awarded by the North American Spine Society (2014)
Awarded a Marsden Grant (2011)
The University of Auckland Early Career Research Excellence Award. (2010)
Albert Trillat Young Investigator's Award, 2005. Presented by The International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, in Florida, USA, April 2005
Awarded the Lottery Health Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship (2005)

 

Responsibilities

Faculty Human Ethics Research Advisor

Committees/Professional groups/Services

Professional affiliations

  • Member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (since 1996)
  • Member, Orthopaedic Research Society, USA (since 2006)

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Goodwin, M., Bräuer B, Lewis, S., Thambyah, A., & Vanholsbeeck, F. (2018). Quantifying birefringence in the bovine model of early osteoarthritis using polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography and mechanical indentation. Scientific reports, 8 (1)10.1038/s41598-018-25982-9
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Frederique Vanholsbeeck
  • Bilton, M. A., Thambyah, A., & Clarke, R. J. (2018). How changes in interconnectivity affect the bulk properties of articular cartilage: a fibre network study. Biomechanics and modeling in mechanobiology10.1007/s10237-018-1027-6
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Richard Clarke
  • Saggese, T., Thambyah, A., Wade, K., & McGlashan, S. R. (2018). Differential Response of Bovine Mature Nucleus Pulposus and Notochordal Cells to Hydrostatic Pressure and Glucose Restriction. Cartilage10.1177/1947603518775795
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Sue McGlashan
  • Schollum, M. L., Wade, K. R., Shan, Z., Robertson, P. A., Thambyah, A., & Broom, N. D. (2018). The Influence of Concordant Complex Posture and Loading Rate on Motion Segment Failure: A Mechanical and Microstructural Investigation. Spine10.1097/brs.0000000000002652
  • Goodwin, M., Thambyah, A., & Vanholsbeeck, F. (2018). Coupling polarisation Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography and mechanical indentation to assess cartilage degeneration. Optics InfoBase Conference Papers. 10.1364/TRANSLATIONAL.2018.JTu3A.35
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Frederique Vanholsbeeck
  • Nickien, M., Thambyah, A., & Broom, N. D. (2017). How a decreased fibrillar interconnectivity influences stiffness and swelling properties during early cartilage degeneration. Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 75, 390-398. 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2017.07.042
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Neil Broom
  • Wade, K. R., Schollum, M. L., Robertson, P. A., Thambyah, A., & Broom, N. D. (2017). A more realistic disc herniation model incorporating compression, flexion and facet-constrained shear: a mechanical and microstructural analysis. Part I: Low rate loading. European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society, 26 (10), 2616-2628. 10.1007/s00586-017-5252-y
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Neil Broom
  • Shan, Z., Wade, K. R., Schollum, M. L., Robertson, P. A., Thambyah, A., & Broom, N. D. (2017). A more realistic disc herniation model incorporating compression, flexion and facet-constrained shear: A mechanical and microstructural analysis. Part II: high rate or 'surprise' loading. European Spine Journal, 26 (10), 2629-2641. 10.1007/s00586-017-5253-x
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Neil Broom

Identifiers

Contact details

Primary office location

ENGINEERING BLOCK 1 - Bldg 401
Level 7, Room 708
20 SYMONDS ST
AUCKLAND 1010
New Zealand

Web links