Faculty of Engineering


Enginuity Day

Each year, the Faculty of Engineering opens its doors to high school girls for a day to inform more young women about the exciting possibilities of careers in engineering.

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Enginuity Day will return on 5 July 2018. We will be sending registration forms to schools across the North Island soon.

Join us for a day of activities held at the University of Auckland's Faculty of Engineering! Enginuity Day is a once-a-year opportunity for Year 13 high school girls to discover what it's like to study engineering, and to explore the possibilities of a future in this area. 

Read on to find out what some previous attendees have said about the event.

 

enginuity day

It was because of this event that I decided to shed my perpetual state of ambiguity with my career choice, and set my heart on becoming an engineer.

- CAILEY DAYU

enginuity day

Callia Drinkwater (Orewa College)


Enginuity Day was a thoroughly enlightening experience. The chance to meet other curious young women from across Auckland and hear the experiences of current and graduated students of the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Engineering was invaluable in making decisions for the future.

Throughout the day we tried our hand at a selection of various engineering sectors and listened to teachers, students and graduates talk to us. Before arriving at the day, I was unsure whether engineering would be suitable for me or not, and by the end of the day I knew it was not something I would not pursue.

This does not make the day a failure in the slightest as this type of clarification is incredibly valuable whilst planning what the future will hold. This day really exposed a variety of things you can do with an engineering degree and the places it can take you. Talking to many people who have been through the same process you’re currently wading through was incredible helpful as they hold the wisdom of hindsight, thus knowing how the degree works in its entirety. Meeting students from all over the country was also a wonderful experience, a room full of intelligent young women brimming with potential and all glad to be given the chance to explore the option of engineering in this busy day. 

Most of the people I talked to there had come for a specific orientation, such as Biomedical or Civil Engineering, and continued to be intent on following that passion. Others, like myself, were there to learn more about engineering, and by the end of the day, many of us were keen to learn more about various engineering sectors.

I would highly recommend this day to any young woman who is vaguely interested in doing a degree to do with engineering, simply to learn more, because there is so much more to the degree than what is typically discussed. As Dr. Keri Moyle pointed out, engineering does not have to be dirty or manual work, it could be software or product development engineering you end up being intrigued in. The opportunities are endless depending on where you take your degree. Many students, such as Janet Van manage to travel whilst working and incorporate a variety of skills into her job on a daily basis, not constrained to drawing up projects.

This day is, of course just a taster of what the faculty can offer, but it gives you the opportunity to ask all the things you were curious about and discover what engineering really is before you decide to delve into a Bachelor of Engineering or write it off. If you decide on the latter, you’ve only gained clarity and a free morning tea.

enginuity day

We each have a unique toolbox comprised of life experience, daily experience, school experience, sport experience, and anything else that we know without knowing we know, which can empower us to improve the conditions of life we see around us, if we know how to be creative in how we approach this toolbox.

- APRIL REID

enginuity day

Cailey Dayu (Ormiston School)


“Engineering is seeking, thinking, and changing,” Dr. Keri Moyle said to the one hundred or so young women in the circular lecture theatre for Enginuity Day 2016 - myself among them. The annual event was held at the University of Auckland this year, hoping to encourage young women to consider engineering as a career. It was very much the event I had hoped for: the opportunity to become exposed to different disciplines of engineering; at the same time, it was a stance against the gender bias still present in society today. I loved every minute of it.

The event kick-started off with an address by Amanda Clinton, followed by guest speakers. While their nuggets of wisdom were just as important, what struck me more was that all the speakers were women. Their lives and adventures are a living testimony that women can have just as bright a future in engineering as any other.

A quick break followed; we were split off into our assigned groups and in one-hour sessions, took part three of the main fields in engineering. Engineering science, which was the first session for my group, deals with the optimization of materials (amongst other things). How might engineers reduce cost and waste? After a brief spiel, we sat behind computers and attempted to deduce the most cost-efficient route to deliver packages within the local Auckland area. More interestingly still, we were tasked to position a round diamond cut from the rough stone through a simulation. The challenge was to reach a price greater than $6000. To some dismay, no one was able to reach it.

In electrical and electronic engineering, the group dealt mostly with sound signals and its conversion to electrical signals and frequencies. We were then provided with a recording of a chattering crowd with music in the background, and assigned to discern what each individual was saying given the specific clips supplied (for example, person A and B talking only). It was a great deal of fun since the voices had been altered and were squeakily high and rushed.

It came as a great surprise that we were greeted by a man on a Segway for mechanical engineering, our last session. (We each took a spin on it later on – to everyone’s delight). The group also dealt with VEX robots and dabbled in a bit of programming to complete tasks. For example, the robot had to pick up a can and place it on the square. This involves driving forward, lowering the lever, lifting the lever, turning 180°… It took a lot of trial and error, but was greatly entertaining.

During lunch, engineers of particular specializations were available to talk to and address any questions.

The day ended with a panel of ‘Women in Engineering Network’ students. It differed from the previous guests as these particular speakers were in their first or second year in university and can remember the transition from high school more vividly. This provided the opportunity to ask more practical questions like: what papers do you take, what advice would you give to your 18 year old selves? (Don’t get a Macbook).

One of the more striking comments from this particular panel was, “Don’t hesitate in taking opportunities.”

So whether you have any doubts, or if you are dead set on engineering, you may find yourself pleasantly surprised – as I have. It was because of this event that I decided to shed my perpetual state of ambiguity with my career choice, and set my heart on becoming an engineer.

Don’t let this opportunity to learn slip by.

From one (previously) lost soul to another.

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Madison Hornblow (Te Aho O Te Kura Pounamu)


It’s always an achievement to fill a lecture theatre with Year 13 girls from across New Zealand, and it’s even more thrilling to spend the day empowering them, encouraging them, and emphasizing to them that they can have a career in a male-dominated industry. On a breezy July Thursday, University of Auckland had their annual, girls only, Engineering Enginuity day.

They did more than provide roast beef sandwiches and purple balloons (relish on rye is always received agreeably, though). They devoted their time to inspire us, and educate us on what an engineer actually does. (It’s not just building popsicle bridges, fortunately). Dr Keri Moyle, an engineering teacher, welcomed us, and immediately disestablished the common stereotypes regarding engineers. She taught us that engineering is everywhere. Engineering was present in the lipstick you put on, and the tap you turned off.

We then migrated to more hands on experiences. Throughout the day, I got to visit workshops that offered advice and insight into specialist engineering areas, such as biomedical, electrical, and chemical. There were friendly students guiding us over the campus, ready to answer our questions and our (also friendly) interrogations.

There are more opportunities in engineering than I previously realized – it’s more than calculus and physics, it’s practical. It can be a glove controlled shooter game or a smartphone gaming app, for example – engineering can be for pleasure. This enginuity day showcased all the ‘hidden’ aspects of engineering, and promoted understanding in a helpful way that I would recommend to any students considering working in the field.

Through this special opportunity I learnt that the future is limitless; it is not bound by gender or stereotypes. My view of the future is ever expanding, as I learn the various ways that a woman can make a difference in the world. The students, and lecturers, from the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Auckland, have done an exceptional job of enlightening young women, and should be congratulated on their continued success to shape these students in a positive way. Because these are not just students: they are the future. 

 Talking to many people who have been through the same process you’re currently wading through was incredible helpful as they hold the wisdom of hindsight, thus knowing how the degree works in its entirety

- CALLIA DRINKWATER

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enginuity day

April Reid (Te Aho O Te Kura Pounamu)


I had never considered engineering as a possible career, yet when my Te Kura Learning Advisor suggested I attend with my sister and friend, I jumped at the opportunity to explore this new arena.

After first settling down in the row of reserved seats and then moving when we realised our mistake, my friend, sister and I took seats in the middle of the lecture hall and the day began. The welcome by Amanda Clinton made me feel completely at home, as she spoke to us about the agenda for the day. She started the day off with a positive atmosphere that made me become excited for what was to come.

I was not disappointed.

As we listened attentively to the presentations by Dr Keri Moyle, Jasleen Kaur, and Janet Van, a common concept leapt out at me. It was about how we each have a unique toolbox comprised of life experience, daily experience, school experience, sport experience, and anything else that we know without knowing we know, which can empower us to improve the conditions of life we see around us, if we know how to be creative in how we approach this toolbox. This concept struck me because it strongly agreed with something my Learning Advisor had been discussing with me regarding approaching the physics exam questions. He was the first person to make me aware of how we can use our life experience/knowledge in most applications of life including finding solutions to physics questions, so it was interesting for me to see how this seemingly simple principle of application could be applied in a wider sense even in the case of engineering to come up with solutions to every day issues. Overall, I found the presentations very well put together, clear, and inspiring.

Morning tea was well timed, especially as I was now hungry from my unusual skipping of breakfast. However, nothing prepared me for the delicious, healthy catered sandwiches which were ready in the cafeteria! I had a fun time meeting and talking to the students around me, discussing our various future plans, as well as how we were enjoying the day so far. I love schoolwork, and it was great being able to talk about subjects with other like-minded students. The student helpers were also very helpful, and came to talk to us about uni life, which I thought was quite special.

My sister, friend and I were all slightly apprehensive about the workshops, but our fears soon dissolved as we saw that we weren’t going to be asked to do anything out of our depth! What I loved about this was being able to talk to any of the girls around me about the physics behind the projects without being looked down upon as ‘smarty’, like usual. The Engineers Without Borders workshop was meaningful. Coming from a 3rd world country, it was pleasant to see how even at Uni you can be an ambassador for those at risk. The electrical engineering workshop completely changed my view on the subject. I enjoyed learning about waves and sound and seeing some of the equipment.

I thoroughly enjoyed the day, and was much impressed by the quality and clarity of the speakers, the informative workshops, and the opportunity to meet other girls who were all studying calculus and physics like me. Thank you for this opportunity! As Dr Keri Moyle said, “all you need to know you have to learn”.

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 I learnt that the future is limitless;
it is not bound by gender or stereotypes.

- MADISON HORNBLOW

enginuity day
enginuity day